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Northrop AV-18 Guardian Attack GERWALK Aircraft

Northrop AV-18 Guardian Attack GERWALK Aircraft

by Tim Wing

I. Dimensions:

  • Height: 4 meters
  • Length: 9.7 meters (with legs extended rearward)
  • Wingspan:  5.5 meters
  • Dry Weight: 16 metric tons
  • Standard Take-off Weight: 21 metric tons
  • Max Take-off Weight: 39.5 metric tons

II. Type

  • Role: Attack GERWALK Aircraft
  • Design: Northrop Aviation
  • Builder: Northrop Aviation

III. Service History: Served with the UN Spacy from 2015 through 2017, and with the United Earth Defense Force (UEDF) Tactical Air Force from 2018 through 2026.

IV. Propulsion:

  • Two Shinnakasu/P&W/Rolls-Royce FF-2001 fusion turbines, engine output 11,500 kg x 2 at max. power; 23,000 kg x 2 available with overboost. Exhaust nozzles allowed for vectored thrust, serving in place of conventional elevators. Exhaust could be diverted through the feet for VTOL lift, through the rear for horizontal propulsion, or through both when flying at low altitude in GERWALK configuration.
  • Powerplant: 2 x RRL-1 Miniaturized Protoculture-cell energizer, delivering 650MW total power.
  • Fuel Capacity: 20 Standard Canisters of Protoculture

V. Performance:

  • Maximum level speed at 30,000+ meters: Mach 2
  • Minimum speed: VTOL capable
  • Maximum running speed: 56 kmph

VI. Electronics:

Radar System:

  • Hughes AWG-20 X-band pulse-Doppler radar, providing long-range detection and tracking of targets at all altitudes.

Optical tracking:

  • Thomson LT-3 multi-frequency laser ranger and designator.
  • Zeiss TS-2 long range forward-looking telescopic array for IR spectrum (FLIR).

Tactical Electronic Warfare System (TEWS):

  • Elettronica Radar Warning Receiver (RWR)
  • OlDelft Infra-red Warning Receiver (IRWR)
  • Westinghouse ALQ-200(V) active radar jammer
  • Chaff dispenser
  • Flares
  • Active missile jammers
  • Multiple L-band VHF and UHF antennas.

VII. Armament:

  • 2 x Colt E-19 4.5 MJ lasers located in the nose of the aircraft. Can fire 60 times per minute.
  • 2 x Mauser GU14 55mm single barrel autocannon; cannon fires APFSDS (Armor Piercing Fin-Stabilized Discarding Sabot) and HESH-I (High Explosive Squash Head-Incendiary) rounds at 250 rounds/minute. Each cannon has an ammunition supply of 250 rounds. Mounted in the wing-roots.
  • 1 x Hughes GU-11 55mm three barreled smoothbore rotary gun pod; has a 200 round capacity. Cannon fires APFSDS (Armor Piercing Fin-Stabilized Discarding Sabot) and HESH-I (High Explosive Squash Head-Incendiary) rounds at 1200 rounds/minute. Carried in the Guardian’s right hand.
  • or 1 x Rheinmetall GU-12 single smoothbore barrel gun pod. Fires 105mm APFSDS and HEAP (High Explosive Armor Piercing) semi-combustible case munitions at 45 rounds/minute. Ammunition supply is 40 rounds.

Six wing hardpoints (three per wing) can carry:

  • 3 x medium range (65 km) Mach 3.0 combined active radar and thermal imager guided AMM-1 Arrow missiles on a specialized MER (Multiple Ejection Rack). Various warhead options.
  • or 1 x missile pod with 10 short range (9km) variable warhead, combined infra-red imager and active radar homing guided Brimstone anti-armor missiles.
  • or 4 x AGM-114 Hellfire air-surface anti-tank missiles
  • or 1 x LAU-61 rocket pod with 19 Hydra 70 70mm unguided rockets.
  • or 1 x GU-11S “Slick” 55mm three barreled smoothbore rotary aerodynamic combat aviation gun pod.
  • or 1 x UMM-7; Armored container with 15 short range (2.5 kps in space) infra-red imager passive radar homing HMM-01 120mm Starburst missiles (from 2014 onward).
  • or 1 x UMM-9; Armored container with 10 short range (8 km) Mach 3.0 combined infra-red imager and active radar homing 190mm Hammerhead missiles, firing from five tubes. Various warhead options (from 2017 onward).
  • or 1 x Firebird missiles. A conventional warhead mounted on the frame of an RMS missile with a range of 234 km and a speed of Mach 6.5, guided by a combined IIR and active/passive radar seeker.
  • or 1 x RMS-1 “Angel Of Death” Nuclear Stand-off missiles. Reaction warhead (200 kT) mounted on a long range (250 km) Mach 4.0 combined multi-spectrum imager and active radar homing Reflex missiles.
  • or 1 x Silencer Anti-Radiation Missile (ARM).
  • or 3 x Alarm anti-radiation missiles. Mounted to a MER.
  • or 3 x Mk-82LDGP 230kg bombs; various fuse options, laser-guided. Mounted to a MER.
  • or 3 x AGM-65R Maverick air-to-ground missiles. Mounted to a MER.
1. Brimstone ATGM pod 2. Brimstone missile 3. 1,800 L tanks Aerial Refueling System (ARS) for conventional aircraft 4. GU-14 55mm cannons 5. Zeiss TS-2 FLIR 6. Hellfire missile 7. AMM-1 Arrow missile 8. GU-11 55mm gun pod 9. Hydra 70 rocket pod 10. UUM-7 pod with HMM-01 120mm Starburst missiles

 

VIII. Armor:

The armor of the Guardian was composed of an advanced titanium-steel alloy, commonly referred to as “Space-metal”. The armor stopped all small arms fire, provided excellent protection against heavier infantry weapons, such as a 12.7mm machinegun round, and good resistance to light mecha-mounted weaponry, such as the Zentraedi 22.3mm HE autocannon round. The armor protection on the Guardian was significantly heavier than that of the VF-1 series Valkyrie.

The Guardian provided full protection from nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards, using an overpressure cockpit environment activated by radiation and hazardous chemical sensors, or manually when biological warfare conditions are anticipated.

IX. Development:

The AV-18 Guardian was developed by Northrop Aviation as a conceptual replacement for the helicopter gunships then in use by the UN Spacy and other member militaries of the Unified Forces. Combining the hovering capabilities and extended loiter time of a helicopter with the speed and range of a high-performance fixed wing aircraft, the AV-18 was in many ways the perfect close air support and armed reconnaissance platform. The design accomplished this by utilizing the GERWALK configuration of the VF-1 Valkyrie Veritech fighter. Though the AV-18 was a fusion turbine powered aircraft like the VF-1, significant cost savings were made by making it non-variable and giving it no space capability. Flyaway price was about one tenth that of a Valkyrie, more in line with the cost of a Destroid or comparable fusion powered fighter aircraft.

The Guardian was based on the general design of the VF-1 Valkyrie, which Northrop also manufactured. The design made use of the Valkyrie’s FF-2001 fusion turbines and RRL-1 Protoculture-cell energizers, as well its avionics suite and weapons systems. The cockpit was nearly identical to later block VF-1 Valkyries, save for the absence of all Battloid mode related control interfaces. The Guardian had significantly heavier armor, as befitted its role as a close air support aircraft. The canopy was remarkable for its thick multi-piece laminated transparent armor.

The Guardian, in YAV-18 form, won in a competitive flyoff with upstart company Maxwell Dynamic’s YAV-17 Aggressor. While the Guardian was based heavily on the already in production VF-1 Valkyrie, the YAV-17 was a more advanced clean-sheet design. Even though the Aggressor was arguably the better aircraft, the Guardian won the competition due to it being a more mature, lower risk design with a significantly lower unit cost. A design difference of note between the YAV-18 and the eventual production AV-18 was the prototype’s single centerline mounted arm. The design was modified to have a more conventional two arm layout in the final production version.

The AV-18 Guardian saw use during the Malcontent Uprisings and was retired shortly before the arrival of the Robotech Masters. No AV-18s accompanied the Pioneer Mission. Some Guardians are thought to have been used by freedom fighters during the Invid occupation.

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Tim Wing

Based on the Guardian from Robotech: RPG Book Eight Strike Force by Wayne Breaux Jr.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2018 Tim Wing

 

 

Northrop F-5 Tiger II Fighter

Northrop F-5 Tiger II Fighter

Though the F-5E was certainly outdated by the end of the First Robotech War, it continued in service through much the Malcontent Uprisings and briefly through the early years of the United Earth Defense Force.  Its reliability and ease of operation made it a viable ground attack platform during the Malcontent Uprisings. It also served, as it had throughout its operational history, as an aggressor fighter. In 2019 the type was finally retired from the United Earth Defense Force (UEDF) inventory after the consolidation of the Unified Forces under the Treaty of the Southern Cross.

  • Role: Light fighter
  • National origin: United States
  • Manufacturer: Northrop Corporation
  • First flight: F-5A – 30 July 1959, F-5E – 11 August 1972
  • Introduction: 1962
  • Retired: 2019
  • Primary users, post 2011: United States Navy (aggressor squadrons, retired 2014), Brazilian Air Force (operated through 2017), Republic of China Air Force (operated through 2017), Republic of Singapore Air Force (retired 2015), Mexican Air Force (retired 2016), UEDF Tactical Air Force (retired 2019)
  • Produced: 1959–1987
  • Number built: 2,246

A little over 70 examples of the F-5 survived the First Robotech War. These included 19 F-5Ns operated as aggressor aircraft by the United States Navy, 26 F-5EMs in service with the Brazilian Air Force, 16 F-5E Tiger 2000s in service with the Republic of China Air Force, 12 F-5Ss in service with the Republic of Singapore Air Force and 12 F-5Hs in service with the Mexican Air Force. Two squadrons, one from Brazil and one from Singapore, were integrated into the UEDF Tactical Air Force (TAF) and continued to operate their F-5s through 2019. Though the F-5’s story ended in 2019, several TAF and UEDF Navy squadrons continued to operate advance versions of the type’s F-20 Tiger Shark progeny through the Second Robotech War.

Brazil operated three Esquadrões of upgraded F-5EMs and F-5FMs during the Malcontent Uprisings. These Tigers had been modernized in the early 2000s by Elbit Systems and Embraer. The modernization centered on several areas: new electronic warfare systems, the Grifo F radar, an air-to-air refueling system, INS/GPS-based navigation, support for new weapons, targeting and self-defense systems, HOTAS, LCD displays, helmet-mounted displays (HMDs), Radar Warning Receiver, encrypted communications, cockpit compatibility for night vision goggles and various new onboard computer upgrades. One important capability was the secure communication with EC-33 Tiger’s Eye airborne early warning platforms and ground stations. These F-5s were used primarily for ground attack and close air support (CAS). While not particularly long legged in comparison to modern fusion turbine powered aircraft of the time, their simplicity and ruggedness led to perhaps the best availability rate of any CAS platform during the war. Due to this, the mighty F-5 flew a much higher portion of ground attack missions than their tiny numbers and old age would lead one to expect.Variants in use after 2012

  • F-5E/F Tiger II: Single-seat fighter version with AN/APQ-159 and two General Electric J85-GE-21B turbojet with 3,500 lb (16 kN) of thrust each.
  • F-5G: The temporary designation given to the Northrop F-20 Tigershark, armed with General Electric AN/APG-67 radar.
  • F-5H/I: F-5E/F upgraded with F-20 avionics suite and two General Electric J85-GE-J1A turbojet with 5,000 lb (22 kN) of thrust each.
  • F-5N: F-5Es used by the U.S. Navy as “aggressor” aircraft, with AN/APG-69 replacing the original AN/APQ-159.
  • F-5S: Upgraded version of the F-5E in use by the Republic of Singapore Air Force, equipped with the Galileo Avionica’s FIAR Grifo-F X-band radar and are capable of firing the AIM-120 AMRAAM.
  • F-5EM: Upgraded version of the F-5E of Brazilian Air Force armed with Italian Grifo-F radar.
  • F-5E Tiger 2000: Upgraded version of Taiwan AIDC, equipped with the GD-53 radar, capable of firing the TC-2 Sky Sword II, MIL-STD-1553B Link and GPS/INS


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Kaoru Shintani

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2018 Tim Wing

 

 

McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk Attack Aircraft

McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk Attack Aircraft

by Tim Wing

The McDonnell Douglas A-4 Skyhawk was a single seat subsonic carrier-capable attack aircraft developed for the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps in the early 1950s. The delta winged, single turbojet engined Skyhawk was designed and produced by Douglas Aircraft Company, and later by McDonnell Douglas. Though very old by the beginning of the Robotech era, it was still in use with the Argentine Air Force, the Israeli Self Defense (IDF) and the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) at the time of the SDF-1’s launch ceremony in 2009. After the end of the war, the A-4 continued to serve in the Argentine Air Force (and later the Merchant Republic), and saw use during the Malcontent Uprisings. The IDF also continued to fly the A-4 for a brief time after the end of the war, but retired the type in 2015.

  • Role: Attack aircraft
  • Manufacturer: McDonnell Douglas
  • Introduction: October 1956
  • Retired: US Marine Corps (1998), RNZAF (2011), IDF (2015), Argentinian Air Force/Merchant Republic Air Force (2024)
  • Produced: 1954–1979
  • Number built: 2,960

Variants

A-4K+ Kahu

The McDonnell Douglas A-4K+ Kahu was a major upgrade for the A-4 Skyhawk light bomber. In 1986, the Royal New Zealand Air Force initiated this project which included the installation of a Westinghouse AN/APG-66 radar optimized for maritime tracking, HOTAS controls and a ‘glass’ cockpit (2 large CRT screens), MIL-STD 1553B databus; Litton Industries LN-93 inertial navigation system, Ferranti 4510 wide-angle HUD, the Vinten airborne video recording system, the General Instruments ALR-66 radar warning receiver, and a Tracor ALR-39 chaff/flare dispenser. This type served with the RNZAF until the end of the First Robotech War, all examples being destroyed in the closing battle.

IAI A-4 Ayit

The IDF operated four variants of the A-4, starting in the sixties with the A-4H. Later variants included the A-4N, and two combat capable trainer variants, the TA-4F and TA-4J. In 2003, Israeli Aerospace Industries (IAI) upgraded all surviving A-4s to A-4I standard (or TA-4I standard in the case of the two-seat variant). Upgrades were limited to an avionics refit, based on the systems in IAI’s Lavi fighter. The A-4I soldiered on in Israeli service until its retirement after the First Robotech War in 2016.

General Dynamics A-4AR Fightinghawk

The General Dynamics A-4AR Fightinghawk was a major upgrade of the McDonnell Douglas A-4M Skyhawk attack aircraft developed for the Argentine Air Force which entered service in 1998. The program was named Fightinghawk in recognition of the F-16 Fighting Falcon, which was the source of its new avionics. The upgrades included: Complete overhaul of the airframe, wiring looms and the Pratt & Whitney J52P-408A engine, installation of Douglas Escapac 1-G3 ejection seats, HGU-55/P helmets, Westinghouse/Northrop Grumman AN/APG-66V2 (ARG-1) radar, HOTAS controls and a ‘glass’ cockpit (2 CRT color screens), Sextant Avionique/Thales Avionics SHUD, two General Dynamics Information Systems AN/AYK-14 mission computers, Northrop AN/ALR-93 (V)1 Radar warning receiver, AN/ALQ-126B jammer, AN/ALQ-162 jammer, ALR-47 chaff/flare dispenser and IFF AN/APX-72.

General characteristics (A-4AR Fighting Hawk)

  • Crew: 1 (2 in OA-4AR)
  • Length12.30 m
  • Wingspan: 8.38 m
  • Height: 4.57 m
  • Wing area: 24.15 m²
  • Empty weight: 4,900 kg
  • Loaded weight: 11,000 kg
  • Max. takeoff weight: 11,136 kg
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney J52P-408A Turbojet, 50.0 kN

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 1080 km/h
  • Range: 3,220 km
  • Service ceiling: 12,880 m
  • Rate of climb: 43 m/s
  • Wing loading: 344.4 kg/m²
  • Thrust/weight: 0.51

Armament

  • Guns: 2× 20 mm (0.787 in) Colt Mk 12 cannon, 100 rounds/gun
  • Missiles: 2× AIM-9M Sidewinder, CITEFA AS-25K
  • Bombs: 9,900 lb (4,490 kg) on five external hardpoints


 

Bibliography:

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2017 Tim Wing

 

 

Ruger M1993 9mm Service Revolver

Sturm, Ruger & Co. M1993 .38 Special (9×29.5mmR) and .357 Magnum (9×33mmR) Service Revolver

by Tim Wing

The M1993 service revolver was first introduced as the Sparrow Hawk in 1993. The revolver was later adopted by the UN Spacy as the M1993 Service Revolver. Though originally adopted as a special purpose sidearm for the UN Spacy Pistol Shooting Team, the Ruger Sparrow Hawk was procured in the largest numbers as the two inch barreled M1993A1 Survival Pistol. This pistol was issued to Veritech Pilots and other air crewmen starting in 2008. It continued to serve in this capacity all the way through till the Invid Invasion. The irony that the pilots of aircraft packed with advance alien technology carried a old fashioned wheel gun as their last line of defense was lost on very few people.

  • Type: double action revolver
  • Place of origin: United States
  • Service history: 1993-2031
  • Used by: UN Spacy, UEDF, various militaries and police departments
  • Manufacturer: Sturm, Ruger & Co.
  • Produced: 1993-2011
  • Number built: 26,000+
  • Cartridge: .38 Special (9×29.5mmR) and .357 Magnum (9×33mmR)
  • Effective firing range: 75 m (M1993) 25 m (M1993A1)
  • Capacity: 6 rounds

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Tim Wing

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2017 Tim Wing

 

 

Maxwell Dynamics VF/A-6 Veritech Fighter Variants gallery

 

Maxwell Dynamics Block 10-14 VAF-6B Thunderbolt III space-optimized Veritech Fighter.


Maxwell Dynamics/Shimada Block 30-45 VE-6J Lightning Bolt electronic warfare Veritech.


Maxwell Dynamics Block 20-29 VF/A-6E with AFC/1 Ground-combat protector weapon system.


Maxwell Dynamics/Shimada Block 30-45 VF/A-6H with  AFC/3-B Legioss with additional armor.


Maxwell Dynamics/Shimada Block 30-45 VF/A-6J with GSA-2 Armored Interceptor armor system.


Shimada Enterprises Block 51-52 VF/A-6Y Shadow Veritech Stealth Fighter.


Shimada Enterprises Block 45+ VF/A-6ZS Shadow Veritech Stealth Fighter.


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. Genesis Climber MOSPEADA (R) is the property of Fuji Television, Artmic Studio and Tatsunoko Production. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Yoshitaka Amano, Shinji Aramaki and Hideki Kakinuma

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized in this publication. http://ptn.home.xs4all.nl/robotech.html

Content by Pieter Thomassen, Peter Walker, and Rob Morgenstern, edited by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2001, 1999, 1997, 1995 Robert Morgenstern, Pieter Thomassen, Peter Walker; 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

Vickers-Chrysler ADR-10-Mk II Raider Air Defense Robot gallery

 

Vickers-Chrysler ADR-10-Mk II Raider Air Defense Robot.

adr-10-mk-ii-raider-2 adr-10-mk-ii-raider-3 adr-10-mk-ii-raider-4


Early production ADR-10-Mk I Raider Air Defense Robot.

adr-10-mk-i-raider-1


Vickers-Chrysler ADR-10-Mk II Raider Air Defense Robot technical illustrations.

adr-10-mk-ii-raider-7 adr-10-mk-ii-raider-6 adr-10-mk-ii-raider-8


Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Tatsunoko Production Co., Ltd. (Robotech II: The Sentinels)

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized on Robotech Illustrated. 

Content by Pieter Thomassen and Peter Walker, edited by Tim Wing

Copyright © 1997, 1995 Robert Morgenstern, Pieter Thomassen, Peter Walker; 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

(Invid Hellcat) Unmanned Reconnaissance/Strike Drone gallery

 

Cougar (Invid Hellcat) Unmanned Reconnaissance/Strike Drone.

cougar-2 cougar-4 cougar-5 cougar-6 cougar-7 cougar-8 cougar-9  cougar-11 cougar-12 cougar-13 cougar-14 cougar-15 cougar-16 cougar-17 cougar-18 cougar-20

 

cougar-21


Cougar (Invid Hellcat) Unmanned Reconnaissance/Strike Drone in action.

cougar-24cougar-23

 

cougar-25


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Tatsunoko Production Co., Ltd. (Robotech II: The Sentinels) and John Waltrip.

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized on Robotech Illustrated. 

Content by Tim Wing, Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Rob Morgenstern

Copyright © 2013 Tim Wing 

 

 

Vickers-Chrysler MBR-10 Excalibur Main Battle Robot gallery

 

Vickers-Chrysler Robotech Systems Inc. MBR-10 mk II/III/IV Excalibur Main Battle Robot.

mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-2 mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-5

mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-7 mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-9 mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-13


MBR-10 mk II/III/IV Excalibur Main Battle Robot markings.

mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-1


VMBR-10 mk II/III/IV Excalibur Main Battle Robot technical illustrations.

mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-3 mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-15 mbr-10-excaliber-main-battle-robot-16


Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Tatsunoko Production Co., Ltd. and Tim Wing

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized in this publication.

Images from – Robotech II: The RPG, Robotech Expeditionary Force Field Guide (March 1989)

Content by Peter Walker and Pieter Thomassen, with Rob Morgenstern, edited by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2000, 1997, 1995 Robert Morgenstern, Pieter Thomassen, Peter Walker; 2016 Tim Wing

 

 

Queadol Magdomilla class Fleet Command Medium Battleship gallery

 

Queadol Magdomilla class Fleet Command Medium Battleship, docked.

Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 2 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 3 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 5 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 6 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 7 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 8


Queadol Magdomilla class Fleet Command Medium Battleship, Assault/Command Ship.

Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 10 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 11 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 13 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 15 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 17 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 18

Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 19Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 16


Queadol Magdomilla-Luhoutzs class Fleet Command Medium Battleship, Orbiter.

Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 20 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 21 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 22


Queadol Magdomilla-Luhoutzs class Fleet Command Medium Battleship, interior spaces.

Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 30

Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 31 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 32 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 40 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 41 Queadol-Magdomilla Strike CruiserTask Force Command Ship 43


Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. The Super Dimension Fortress Macross (R) is the properties of Big West Advertising and Studio Nue. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Miyatake Kazutaka

Acknowledgement is extended to the work of Egan Loo and the Macross Compendium. Egan Loo is given all credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the Macross Compendium that has been utilized in this publication.

Images Courtesy of Chad Wilson (Marchly) and the Macross Mecha Manual. Chad Wilson is given all credit for all images from the Macross Mecha Manual that have been utilized in this publication. http://www.macross2.net/m3/m3-index.htm

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized in this publication.

Images from – Macross Perfect Memory (1983)

Content by Pieter Thomassen and Peter Walker, edited by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2004, 1999 Robert Morgenstern, Pieter Thomassen, Peter Walker; 2016 Tim Wing