FMC M2200 Janissary Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle

M9A4 Inca Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle 1

ROBOTECH Technical Files

by Robert Morgenstern, with Peter Walker and Pieter Thomassen

edited by Tim Wing

Attachments:

  • M2200 Janissary reference file
  • M2200 Janissary gallery

Designation: Food Machinery Corporation M2200 Janissary Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle

I. Dimensions.

(M2201A5 Janissary AIFV)

  • Length: 6.4 meters
  • Width: 3.3 meters
  • Height: 2.9 meters
  • Weight: 25 metric tons, 34.5 metric tons with full armor package.

(M2204A4 Battlefield Surveillance Radar Vehicle)

  • Length: 6.4 meters
  • Width: 3.3 meters
  • Height: 2.9 meters
  • Tower raised: 3.6 meters
  • Weight: 24.2 metric tons.

II. Type.

  • M2200-APC: Two crew, twelve passenger Armored Personnel Carrier. Welded space-metal construction with diesel hybrid electric drive. This variant had the option of being armed with a Protector M151 remote weapons system with an M2 .50 caliber heavy machine gun, mounted on the front left corner of the vehicle.
  • M2200A1-APC: Two crew, twelve passenger Armored Personnel Carrier. Improved welded space-metal construction with provision for additional add-on reactive and passive armor, improved diesel hybrid electric drive. This variant had the option of being armed with a Protector M151 remote weapons system with an M2 .50 caliber heavy machine gun, mounted on the front left corner of the vehicle.
  • M2201A2-AIFV: Three crew, six passenger Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle. Welded space-metal construction with provision for additional add-on reactive and passive armor, diesel hybrid electric drive. Armed with a two man Krauss-Maffei Wegmann GmbH manufactured turret with one 30mm chain gun, 7.62 coaxial machine gun and three (Rapier) ATGMs mounted in the center of the vehicle.
  • M2201A3-AIFV: Two crew, twelve passenger Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle. Improved welded space-metal construction with provision for additional add-on reactive and passive armor, improved diesel hybrid electric drive. Armed with a remote weapons system turret with a pulse laser cannon and an independent Protoculture-cell energizer power source, mounted on the front left corner of the vehicle.m2200a3-inca-armored-infantry-fighting-vehicle-3
  • M2201A4-AIFV: Two crew, twelve passenger Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle. Improved welded space-metal construction with provision for additional add-on reactive and passive armor, Protoculture-cell energizer power system. Armed with a remote weapons system turret with a pulse laser cannon, mounted on the front left corner of the vehicle.
  • M2201A5-AIFV: Two crew, twelve passenger Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle. Improved welded space-metal construction with Chobham frontal armor and provision for additional add-on reactive and passive armor, Protoculture-cell energizer power system. Armed with a remote weapons system turret with a pulse laser cannon, mounted on the front left corner of the vehicle.

Though not exhaustive, the below list includes many of the major variants of the M2200 Janissary APC/AIFV that served with the UN Spacy, the Unified Forces, the United Earth Defense Forces and the United Earth Expeditionary Forces.

  • M2202-CFV: Cavalry Fighting Vehicle
  • M2206-MEV: Baseline M2200 configured for the transport of four or six patients on stretchers. This variant has no weapons system turret of any kind. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2206A4-MEV onwards.
  • M2205-ESV: Engineer Support Vehicle equipped with a 105mm demolition gun and a dozer blade.
  • M2267 Chupacabra: M2200 chassis fitted out as a smoke screen generator vehicle for providing battlefield obscuration. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2267A2 onwards.
  • M2215: A mortar carrier armed with a 120mm mortar mounted on a turntable in the rear troop compartment. The mortar could be fired from the vehicle, but could also be fired dismounted. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2215A4 onwards.
  • M2234: Another mortar carrier, basically an M2215 armed with an 81 mm mortar. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2234A3 onwards.
  • M2259: Anti-tank variant equipped with a Bofors MRL-2 missile launcher with six short range (8.2km) combined infra-red imager and passive laser homing 120mm Rapier III missiles. No Protoculture powered variant.
  • M2272: Anti-aircraft variant equipped with a 40 mm Bofors cannon and radar guided fire control system. No Protoculture powered variant.
  • M2257: Anti-aircraft variant equipped with a launcher armed with an Oerlikon MRL-3 missile launcher mounted on rear of the vehicle. The missile launcher is fitted for 6 short range Mach 3.0 IR-guided Stinger II anti-aircraft missiles. No Protoculture powered variant.
  • M2273: Command variant, the roof over the rear troop compartment is higher. The vehicle also carries additional radios and a generator. A variant of this was the M2264 standard integrated command post system carrier, equipped with UEDF automated command and control system. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2273A3 and M2264A1 onwards.
  • M2204: Battlefield surveillance radar equipped variant. This variant had the option of mounting an articulated observation platform. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2204A3 onwards.
  • M2275: A repair and light recovery vehicle equipped with a crane. No Protoculture powered variant.
  • M2272: A repair and light recovery vehicle equipped with an internal winch and two earth anchors mounted on the rear hull. Protoculture-cell energizer power system from M2272A2 onwards.
  • M2297: Anti-tank variant equipped with an MM-12 missile launcher with 12 190mm x 540mm variable warhead, short range (8.2 km) Mach 3.0 combined infra-red imager and active radar homing Hammerhead missiles. All variants were Protoculture-cell energizer powered.

III. Service History

Since the militaries that adopted the M2200 in one form or another are almost too prolific to count, this section will only include the militaries of the United Earth Government. Developed from 2001 to 2004, this vehicle was adopted in very limited numbers by the UN Sapcy as they did not field a ground force in any significant numbers, other the UN Spacy Marine Corps, which was really more of a space based anyway. The M2200 was fielded in large numbers by individual militaries of the Unified Forces from 2004 onwards. After the consolidation of the Unified Forces under the Treaty of the Southern Cross, the M2200 was adopted by both the United Earth Defense Forces (UEDF) as their primary Infantry Fighting Vehicle in 2018, and in Protoculture-cell energizer powered form by the Reconnaissance Expeditionary Force/United Earth Expeditionary Force (REF/UEEF) 2021. The M2200 stayed in use with the UEDF until the Invid Invasion, and with the UEEF until late 2040s.

IV. Propulsion.

(M2201A2 Janissary AIFV and other conventionally powered M2200-series)

  • Engine: 2 Siemens electric motors providing 340 hp each
  • Power-source: Cummins VTA-2005 10-cylinder diesel driving a generator

(M2201A5 Janissary AIFV and other Protoculture powered M2200-series)

  • Engine: 2 Siemens electric motors providing 340 hp each
  • Power-source: 1 x RRG FR-1P Miniaturized Protoculture-cell energizer
  • Fuel Capacity: 8 standard canisters of protoculture.

V. Performance.

(M2201A2 Janissary AIFV and other conventionally powered M2200-series)

  • Maximum speed: 65 kph
  • Maximum speed, swimming: 13 kph
  • Maximum range: 640 km

(M2201A5 Janissary AIFV and other Protoculture powered M2200-series)

  • Maximum speed: 65 kph
  • Maximum speed, swimming: 13 kph
  • Maximum range: limited to around 48 hours of operational use

(M2204A4 Battlefield Surveillance Radar Vehicle)

  • Maximum speed: 65 kph
  • Maximum speed, swimming: 13 kph
  • Maximum range: limited to around 48 hours of operational use

VI. Electronics Suite.

Radar tracking:

(M2204A4 Battlefield Surveillance Radar Vehicle)

  • Westinghouse APG-154 X-band long range multimode radar capable of linking with other battlefield systems to provide centralized command, control and communications to the theater. The system is supported via a raiseable antenna mast to increase range at the expense of additional ground clutter.

Optical tracking:

(M2201A5 AIFV and M2204A4 Battlefield Surveillance Radar Vehicle)

  • Thomson DOS-2500 multi-band motion-stabilized digital spherical camera system, for medium range 360 degree elevation traversable infra-red imaging, optical and ultra-violet band detection and tracking.
  • Thomson LT-3 multi-frequency laser ranger and designator.

Tactical Electronic Warfare System (TEWS):

  • Elettronica Radar Warning Receiver (RWR)
  • OlDelft Infra-red Warning Receiver (IRWR)
  • Smoke dispenser

Command and Control System:

(M2204A4 Battlefield Surveillance Radar Vehicle)

  • Tactical command, control, communications and intelligence system for coordinating air defense and battlefield operations.
  • Various multimode, multiband terrestrial and satellite communication systems.
  • Westinghouse Identify Friend/Foe (IFF) Transponder

VII. Armament.

(M2201A5 Janissary AIFV)

  • 1 x HL-80 80 mm rapid fire pulse laser capable of firing 1 MJ pulses at a rate of 4 pulses/sec. System is powered by the main Protoculture-cell energizer (or, in the case of the conventionally powered vehicles, by a dedicated Protoculture-cell energizer).
  • 10 x Smoke Dispensers
  • 6 x Gun ports for passengers located to either side of the rear compartment

(M2205A4 Engineer Support Vehicle)

  • 1 x L8A1 105mm short barrel, low pressure, demolition gun firing High Explosive (HE), High Explosive Squash Head (HESH) or High Explosive Incendiary (HEI) for the purpose of obstacle and bunker destruction.
  • 10 x Smoke Dispensers
  • 2 x Gun ports for passengers located to either side of the rear compartment

(M2204A4 Battlefield Surveillance Radar Vehicle)

  • 10 x Smoke Dispensers
  • 2 x Gun ports for passengers located to either side of the rear sensor compartment

VIII. Armor.

The body of all M2200 series vehicles are composed of welded space-metal alloys. The armor stops all small arms, and heavy infantry weapons fire, provides fair to good resistance to light mecha-mounted weaponry such as Zentraedi 22.3mm autocannon, and provides poor resistance to medium mecha-mounted weaponry, such as the Valkyrie’s 55mm APFSDS round.

The frontal armor the M2201A5 Janissary armored carriers is composed of a standard Chobam laminar developed in the late 20th century and improved with the materials science advances made during the Robotech era. This armor was mainly designed to defeat projectiles and other kinetic weapons. The armor stops all small arms, and heavy infantry weapons fire, provides good resistance to light mecha-mounted weaponry, and provides fair resistance to medium mecha-mounted weaponry, such as the Valkyrie’s 55mm APFSDS round. Armor is slightly better than the FIAT 6836/6846 Heavy Armored Vehicles.

All Janissarys from the M2200A1 onwards could be fitted with a variety of passive and reactive armor sets, providing protection levels similar to that of the built in Chobham armor on the frontal slope of the M2201A5.

The Janissary provides full protection from nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards, using an overpressure crew compartment environment activated by radiation and hazardous chemical sensors, or manually when biological warfare conditions are anticipated. The internal consumables supplies can provide atmosphere for one week maximum.

IX. Development.

The M2200 Janissary AIFV was developed by the Food Machinery Corporation in the United States as a prototype series to explore advanced technology from the downed ASS-1 space fortress and to replace the aging IFVs of the day. They based the overall design on their ubiquitous M113, which had been in production since the 1960s. This vehicle design was a precursor to the Destroid series development program and helped paved the way for the introduction of these armored giants. Originally, they M2200 tested out and put into production advances in material science. They were powered by conventional diesel engines, but had an innovative hybrid electric drive system. This was a diesel engine producing power by driving a generator, which in turn provided electrical power to a pair of Siemens electric motors located at the drive sprockets. The engine was a 500 HP Cummins VTA-2005 10-cylinder diesel that powered later versions of FMC’s M2 Bradley. Later, as technology matured, the M9A4 Janissary was equipped with a Protoculture-cell energizer as its source of motive power. (Though the protoculture powered variant was a success, the majority of Janissarys used by the UEDF were M2201A3s, which were powered by conventional diesel engines.)

The Janissary Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle (AIFV) began full series production in 2004. This armored vehicle has a respectable power to weight ratio and can traverse rough terrain. The M2200 through M2201A4 variants are amphibious when running without any add on armor, so long as the water is not too rough to capsize the carrier. The M2200 is constructed from what is generically referred to as space-metal. (Space-metal was actually a term applied to a variety of advanced alloys created after the arrival of the SDF-1.) The metal in this case was a light weight alloy with armor qualities superior to titanium. This alloy provided far superior protection when compared to the aluminum armor which was typical of all armored personnel carriers up to this point. In its basic form, the M2200 had better protection than an M2 Bradley with a full set of Explosive Reactive Armor (ERA). The M2200A1 introduced the ability to attach armor upgrade packages consisting of passive Chobham style armor and ERA. Though the full package added an additional ten tons to the Janissary, it provided it with armor superior to a Destroid, and approaching that of some older tanks.

M9A5 Inca Armored Command Carrier 1The M2200 was purchased in huge numbers by the different militaries making up the Unified Forces from 2004 to 2011. After FMC’s manufacturing facility was rebuilt after the Zentraedi Rain of Death, the Janissary went right back into production starting in 2015. After the signing of the Treaty of the Southern Cross, the United Earth Defense Force (UEDF) adopted the Janissary as their primary Infantry Fighting Vehicle. Though there was a profusion of different types of IFVs in use by the Unified Forces at that time, the Janissary was by far most advanced and one of the most popular. This made the UEDF’s choice a bit of a no-brainer. The UEDF, being chronically underfunded in comparison to the United Earth Expeditionary Force (UEEF), was reliant on the M2200 Janissary as well as a variety of other conventional armored vehicles as these vehicles were significantly cheaper than Veritechs and Battloids.

The UEEF (at that time still being called the Reconnaissance Expeditionary Force) also purchased a huge number of Janissarys. Since the UEEF did not want to be reliant on an uncertain supply chain of conventional fuels such as diesel and JP-8 and since funding was not as much of a problem for them, they purchased almost exclusively Protoculture-cell energizer powered tracks. These vehicles served in a variety of roles and were not fully retired until after the Third Robotech War.

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. Super Dimension Cavalry Southern Cross (R) is the property of Big West Advertising, Tatsunoko Studio and Ammonite studio. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Kogawa Tomonori, Hiroyuki Kitazume, Miyo Sonoda, Hiroshi Ogawa, Hirotoshi Ohkura and Takashi Ono; Brian Manning

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized in this publication. 

Images from – The Robotech RPG Book Four: Southern Cross (September 1987), This is Animation #10 The Southern Cross and other unspecified Super Dimensional Cavalry Southern Cross OSM

Content by Robert Morgenstern, Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen, edited by Tim Wing

Copyright © 1997 Robert Morgenstern, Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen; 2016 Tim Wing

 

 

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