Monthly Archives: January 2016

Сухой Су-27 Многоцелевой истребитель завоевания превосходства в воздухе


Sukhoi Su-27 (Flanker) Multirole Air Superiority Fighter

by Tim Wing

The Sukhoi Su-27 (UEDF reporting name: Flanker) was a twin-engine supermaneuverable fighter aircraft designed by Sukhoi. It was intended as a direct competitor for the large United States fourth-generation fighters such as the Grumman F-14 Tomcat and F-15 Eagle, with 3,530-kilometre range, heavy aircraft ordnance, sophisticated avionics and high maneuverability. The Su-27 complemented the smaller MiG-29. With constant upgrades throughout its lifespan, the Su-27 stayed in front line service well into the middle twenties. With hundreds having been exported to various countries both within and outside of the Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States, the Su-27 was still flying after the Invid Occupation.

  • Role: Multirole Air superiority fighter
  • National origin: Soviet Union
  • Design group: Sukhoi
  • Built by: Sukhoi and Komsomolsk-on-Amur Aircraft Production Association (KnAAPO)
  • First flight: 20 May 1977 (Su-27), 28 June 1988 (Su-27M), 19 February 2008 (Su-27ST)
  • Introduction: 22 June 1985
  • Status: Retired
  • Primary users: EBSIS
  • Produced: 1982–2019
  • Number built: 1800
  • Unit cost: $30 million (Su-27, in adjusted 2070 International Credits), $65 million (Su-27M, in adjusted 2070 International Credits), $148 million (Su-27ST, in adjusted 2070 International Credits)

Various versions were produced throughout the Flanker’s lifespan (see below). They can be best broken up into three main groups. The first (Flankers B, C and D) were fourth generation fighters, equipped with 1980s era Soviet technology. The middle (Flankers E and F) were considered fourth generation plus. They had advanced avionics, full glass cockpits and conventional engines that were capable of super-cruise. The Flanker F was notable, as it was a VTOL fighter which used a Soviet development of the GERWALK system found on the VF-1 Valkyrie fighter. The final Flankers, or “Fusion Flankers” as they were commonly called, made use of the most advanced technology to come out of the Robotech era. The Flankers G, H and I were equipped with fusion turbine engines and protoculture cell energizer power plant. Other improvements include a heavy laser in place of the traditional 30mm cannon and further improved avionics.

In its final form, the Flanker was fully modern combat aircraft. Aerodynamically, very little on the Flanker changed throughout the years. But with fusion turbines and laser armament, it was quite comparable to the F-206 Falcon II and F-209 Sylphid fighter aircraft of the United Earth Defense Force. This is a testament to the soundness of the original design.

Variants:Flanker 5

Flanker A

  • Su-27 Pre-production series built in small numbers with AL-31 engine

Flanker B

  • Su-27S: Initial production single-seater with improved AL-31F engine.
  • Su-27SM: Mid-life upgraded Russian Su-27S, featuring technology evaluated in the Su-27M demonstrators.
  • Su-27SM2: 4+ gen block upgrade for Russian Su-27, featuring some technology of the Su-27BM; it includes Irbis-E radar, and upgraded engines and avionics.
  • Su-27SM3: The same as the Su-27SM2 but is built new rather than a mid-life upgrade.
  • Su-27P: Standard version but without air-to-ground weapons control system and wiring and assigned to Soviet Air Defense Forces units.
  • Su-27SK: Export Su-27S single-seater.
  • Shenyang J-11: Chinese version of Su-27SK.
  • Su-27SKM: Single-seat multi-role fighter for export. It is a derivative of the Su-27SK but includes upgrades such as advanced cockpit, more sophisticated self-defense electronic countermeasures (ECM) and an in-flight refueling system.

Flanker C

  • Su-27UB: Initial production two-seat operational conversion trainer.
  • Su-27UB2: Twin-engine, two-seat supermaneuverable multirole fighter for all-weather, air-to-air and air-to-surface deep interdiction missions.
  • Su-27UBM: Upgraded Su-27UB two-seater, includes upgrades such as advanced cockpit, more sophisticated self-defense electronic countermeasures (ECM) and an in-flight refueling system.
  • Su-27UBM2: 4+ gen multi-role two-seater, featuring some technology of the Su-27BM; it includes Irbis-E radar, and upgraded engines and avionics.
  • Su-27P: Two-seat version of the Su-27P interceptor, designed to support with tactical data other single-seat Su-27P, MiG-25 “Foxhound” and other interceptor aircraft in PVO service. Later modified into a multi-role fighter mainly for export market, moving away from the original purpose of the aircraft.
  • Su-27UBK: Export Su-27UB two-seater.
  • Su-27UBKM2: Export variant 4+ gen multi-role two-seater, featuring some technology of the Su-27BM; it includes Irbis-E radar, and upgraded engines and avionics. Versions include Su-27MKA for Algeria, Su-27MKI for India, Su-27MKK for the People’s Republic of China, and Su-27MKM for Malaysia.

Flanker D

  • Su-27K: Carrier-based single-seater with folding wings, high-lift devices, and arresting gear, built in small numbers.
  • Su-27K2: Upgraded Su-27K.
  • Su-27KUB: Essentially an Su-27K carrier-based twin-seater with a side-by-side cockpit, for use as a naval carrier trainer or multi-role aircraft.

Flanker 1Flanker E

  • Su-27M: 4+ gen improved single-seat multi-role Su-27S derivative. Improvements include Saturn 117S (AL-41F1S) afterburning turbofans with 3D thrust vectoring nozzles, full glass cockpit, and advance avionics. First Flanker to field the Irbis-E passive phased array radar.

Flanker F

  • Su-27MP: VTOL Su-27M with GERWALK style engine/leg configuration. Primarily used by the Soviet Navy on their short deck VTOL carriers. The P in the designation was for Pervyy Effektivnoye Usileniye Krylatyy vooruzheniya s Lokomotiva kolennogo sustava, a direct translation of Ground Effective Reinforcement of Winged Armament with Locomotive Knee-Joint (GERWALK).
  • Su-27MPK: Export version of the Su-27MP.

Flanker G

  • Su-27ST: The “Fusion Flanker”. Single seat Su-27 upgraded with fusion turbine engines and protoculture cell energizer power plant. Other improvements include a heavy laser in place of the traditional 30mm cannon and further improved avionics.
  • Su-27ST2: New build version of the Su-27ST.

Flanker H

  • Su-27UBST: Two seat Su-27 upgraded with fusion turbine engines and protoculture cell energizer power plant. Other improvements include a heavy laser in place of the traditional 30mm cannon and further improved avionics.
  • Su-27UBST2: New build version of the Su-27UBST.

Flanker I

  • Su-27MPST: Fusion turbine powered VTOL Flanker with GERWALK style engine/leg configuration. Primarily used by the Soviet Navy on their short deck VTOL carriers.

Fullback

  • Su-34: Two-seat dedicated long-range strike variant with side-by-side seating in “platypus” nose.

 

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

 

Сухой Су-25 Грач Закрыть воздушной поддержки самолета

Sukhoi Su-25 Grach (Frogfoot) Close Air Support Aircraft

by Tim Wing

The Sukhoi Su-25 Grach (meaning rook; NATO reporting name: “Frogfoot”) was a single-seat, twin-engine jet aircraft developed in the Soviet Union by the Sukhoi Design Bureau. It was designed to provide close air support for the Soviet Ground Forces.

The Su-25 was a heavily armored, short range close air support aircraft, comparable to the American A-10 Thunderbolt II. Though it was replaced in front line service in the Soviet Airforce by the MiG-31 Karyovin in the early 2000’s, the Frogfoot continued to serve with various Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States (EBSIS) air forces all the way till the Invid Invasion due it robust nature and ease of maintenance and operation.

Frogfoot 1

  • Role: Close air support
  • Manufacturer: Sukhoi Design Bureau, Tbilisi Aircraft Manufacturing
  • First flight: 22 February 1975
  • Introduction: 19 July 1981
  • Status: Retired
  • In service: 1981-2031
  • Primary users: EBSIS
  • Produced: 1978–2011
  • Number built: Over 1,000
  • Unit cost: $15 million (in adjusted 2070 International Credits)

Air Forces using the Su-25 in 2030: People’s Republic of Bulgaria, People’s Socialist Republic of Albania, People’s Republic of Greece, Syrian Socialist Republic, Iraqi Socialist Republic, Iranian Democratic Republic, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, People’s Republic of Egypt, People’s Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Somali Democratic Republic, People’s Republic of Benin, People’s Republic of the Congo, and the Republic of Cuba.


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

 

Сухой Су-24 Всепогодный бомбардировщик

Fencer 1

Sukhoi Su-24 (Fencer) All-Weather Bomber Aircraft

by Tim Wing

The Sukhoi Su-24 (UEDF reporting name: Fencer) was a supersonic, all-weather bomber aircraft developed in the Soviet Union. The aircraft featured a variable-sweep wing, twin-engines and a side-by-side seating arrangement for its two crew. It was the first of the USSR’s aircraft to carry an integrated digital navigation/attack system. It remained in service with the Air Forces of the Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States (EBSIS) until replaced by the Su-34 Fullback in the late 2010’s.

 

  • Role: All-weather bomber
  • Manufacturer: Sukhoi
  • First flight: 2 July 1967
  • Introduction: 1974
  • Status: Retired
  • Primary users: EBSIS (Soviet Air Force)
  • Produced: 1967–1993
  • Number built: Approximately 1,400
  • Unit cost: $39 million (in adjusted 2070 International Credits)

 

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

 

Микоян-Гуревич МиГ-29 Fulcrum E Многоцелевой истребитель Самолеты

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29E (Fulcrum) Multi-role Fighter Aircraft

by Tim Wing

The Mikoyan MiG-29 (Russian: Микоян МиГ-29; UEDF reporting name: “Fulcrum”) was a twin-engine jet fighter aircraft designed in the Soviet Union. Developed by the Mikoyan design bureau as an air superiority fighter during the 1970s, the MiG-29, along with the larger Sukhoi Su-27, was developed to counter new American fighters such as the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, and the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon. The MiG-29 entered service with the Soviet Air Force in 1982.

The MiG-29E was a significant upgrade of the Fulcrum. Entering production in 2005 and incorporating many of the technological advances from the SDF-1, the MiG-29E sported upgraded engines and avionics. Though still considered a fourth generation design, the upgraded Fulcrum was fully competitive with fifth generation aircraft such as the
McDonnell Douglas F-203 Dragon II. The new R-49 engines and strengthened airframe allowed speeds of up Mach 3.2 for short periods of time. Additionally, the R-49 was a much more fuel efficient design, which nearly doubled the Fulcrum’s range (long a weak-point of the aircraft) and allowed for super-cruise. Its improved radar/targeting system was able to detect a cruise missile-type target flying as low as 60 meters, at a range of 50 kilometers. This dynamic jet fighter went on to become the backbone of the EBSIS’s air forces until replaced by the MiG-238 in the mid twenties.

Fulcrum 2

General Characteristics

  • Type: Multi-role Fighter Aircraft
  • Crew: One
  • Length: 17.37 meters
  • Wingspan: 11.4 meters
  • Height: 4.73 meters
  • Empty weight: 11,000 kg
  • Loaded weight: 15,300 kg
  • Max. takeoff weight: 20,000 kg
  • Engines: 2 x R-49 afterburning turbojets

Performance

  • Speed: Mach 3.2 at altitude; Mach 2 at sea level
  • Service ceiling of 27,450 meters
  • Range: 2600km

Weapon Systems

  • 2 x Long Range Missiles mounted on the fuselage, range 643km
  • 6 x Air to Air, Medium Range Missiles, range 64 km; radar and I.R. targeting/guided.
  • 1 x 23mm GSh-23 Auto-Cannon mounted in the forward section, range 1300 meters, payload 240 rounds.

Fulcrum 1


 

 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

 

Микоян-Гуревич МиГ-25 СТ-перехватчик самолета

Foxhound 2

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25ST (Foxhound F) Interceptor Aircraft

by Tim Wing

The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25 (Russian: Микоян МиГ-25; UEDF reporting name: Foxhound) was a supersonic interceptor aircraft developed for use by the Soviet Air Forces. The aircraft was designed by the Mikoyan-Gurevich design bureau as a replacement for the earlier MiG-25 “Foxbat”. Though Mikoyan retained the MiG-25 designation of its forbearer, the MiG-25M was a significantly redesigned aircraft. So much so, that when it first appeared in the early eighties, NATO gave it the designation “Foxhound” to differentiate it.

The Foxhound was never exported outside of the Soviet Union, not even to fellow Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States (EBSIS) members. The aircraft’s airframe was constructed almost entirely titanium and high-strength alloys. In the years following the 1st Robotech War, the Foxhound was upgraded with fusion-turbines and protoculture cell energizers as the main power source. This version was known as the MiG25ST (ST standing for sliyaniye turbiny / Слияние турбины, that is fusion turbine in Russian), or Foxhound F in UEDF reporting parlance. This engine upgrade allowed for an effectively unlimited range and cruising speeds in excess of Mach 2. This, combined with the Soviet Union’s most advance electronically scanned phased array radar and long range missiles with either conventional or nuclear warheads, made the Foxhound an extremely capable high altitude interceptor. The Foxhound F also mounted a laser cannon, though this weapons was of insignificant yield and was later deleted.

Foxhound 1

  • Role: Interceptor aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Mikoyan-Gurevich
  • First flight: 16 September 1975
  • Introduction: 6 May 1981
  • Status: Retired
  • Service life: 1981-2031
  • Primary users: Soviet Air Force
  • Produced: 1975–1994
  • Number built: 752

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two (pilot and weapons system officer)
  • Length: 22.69 m
  • Wingspan: 13.46 m
  • Empty weight: 21,820 kg
  • Max. takeoff weight: 46,200 kg

Performance (fusion-turbine variant)

  • Maximum speed:
  • High altitude: Mach 3 + (3,000 km/h)
  • Low altitude: Mach 1.2 (1,500 km/h)
  • Combat radius: unlimitedFoxhound 3
  • Service ceiling: 25,000 m
  • Rate of climb: 306 m/s
  • Thrust/weight: 1.25 to 1
  • Maximum g-load: 5 g

 


 

 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

Микоян-Гуревич МиГ-21 Истребитель Балалайка

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 Balalaika (Fishbed) Fighter Aircraft

by Tim Wing

The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 (Russian: Микоян и Гуревич МиГ-21; UEDF reporting name: Fishbed) was a supersonic jet fighter aircraft, designed by the Mikoyan-Gurevich Design Bureau in the Soviet Union. It was popularly nicknamed “Balalaika”, from the aircraft’s resemblance to the Russian stringed musical instrument.

Fishbed 1AThough considered antiquated by the beginning of the Robotech era, due to the type’s high production numbers it remained in service well into the inter-war period. When the SDF-1 crashed landed on Earth, the MiG-21 was no longer in service with the Soviet Air Force. It did, however, make up the bulk of many third world air forces all over the world. After the end of the 1st Robotech War, these planes continued with many of these air forces, simply because there was no other choice for the time being. After the formation of the Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States (EBSIS), the MiG-21 saw a brief period of renewal, as many of the member states had their gaining fleets upgraded with newer technology. This of course was little more than a stop gap. By 2022, all MiG-21s had been retired in the EBSIS, having been replaced by newer aircraft. As an interesting side note, the MiG-21 even saw use in the United Earth Defense Force (UEDF), for a very brief period of time, as former Indian Air Force squadrons were integrated in 2018.

Though the MiG-21 was by no means a match for modern fighters in the early part of the 21st Century, it did have the ability to surprise those who failed to take it seriously. In upgraded form, the MiG-21 had an excellent thrust to weight ratio and its small size made it a very hard to spot target. From the front, the MiG-21 presented a very small radar cross section. This allowed the plane’s pilots to get well within the firing envelope of its air to air missiles. If the MiG-21 was lucky enough to make it to the merge, its excellent maneuverability at least gave it a fighting chance against adversaries several generations newer.

  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Mikoyan-Gurevich OKB
  • First flight: 14 February 1956 (Ye-2)
  • Introduction: 1959 (MiG-21F)
  • Status: Retired
  • Primary users: Soviet Air Force, Indian Air Force
  • In service: 1960-2022
  • Produced: 1959 (MiG-21F) to 1985 (MiG-21bis)
  • Number built: 11,496

 

 


 

 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

Миль Ми-28 Вертолет Атака

Havoc 1
Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant Mi-28 (Havoc) Attack Helicopter

by Tim Wing

The Mil Mi-28 (UEDF reporting name “Havoc”) was a Soviet all-weather anti-armor attack helicopter. After a protracted development period, the first all-weather version, the Mi-28N, entered service with the Soviet Air Force. The Mi-28 went on to equip the air forces of several other Warsaw Pact states, and later became the primary attack helicopter for several air forces within the Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States. The type served through till the Invid Invasion.

The Mi-28 was an attack helicopter in the classic sense of the word. It had a tandem seat layout and a thin fuselage, with no troop carrying ability. Post war versions were made out of advance “space metal” alloys and included the latest advancements in avionics. The final versions of the Mi-28 had a mast mounted radar, 30 mm Shipunov 2A42 autocannon in a turret under the nose and four under hardpoints. The hardpoints could carry unguided rocket pods, short and medium range air to ground missiles, or short range air to air missiles for self-defense.

  • Havoc 2Role: Attack helicopter
  • National origin: Soviet Union/EBSIS
  • Manufacturer: Mil
  • First flight: 10 November 1982
  • Introduction: 1993
  • Status: retired
  • Primary users: Soviet Air Force, various EBSIS member states
  • Produced: 1982–2018
  • Number built: 1656
  • Unit cost: $22 million (in adjusted 2070 International Credits)

 


 

 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

Миль Ми-24 Крокодил Атака Вертолет

Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant Mi-24 Krokodil (Crocodile, Hind) Attack Helicopter

by Tim Wing

The immortal Mil Mi-24 (Russian: Миль Ми-24; UEDF reporting name: Hind) is a large helicopter gunship, attack helicopter and low-capacity troop transport with room for eight passengers. It was produced by Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant and has been operated since 1972 by the Soviet Air Force and its successors, along with more than fifty other nations. The Hind one of only couple aircraft to have remained in continuous service for an entire century!

The Hind, in its final variant, remained in service with the Soviet Air Force and other members of the Eastern Block of Soviet Independent States (EBSIS) up until the Invid Invasion. Though the Hind was well past its prime as an attack helicopter, it continued to serve the Soviet Union and her client states as an armed troop carrier. Through the Invid Occupation, Hinds were used by various freedom fighter groups. After the liberation of Earth, the Hind continued to serve Russia and many other countries. Though phased out of service after reunification and the formation of the Federal Combined Planetary Forces, the Hind continues to fly with the air forces of several non-aligned states.

In its final variants, the Hind benefited from advances made after the arrival of the SDF-1. Lighter and stronger metals lead to a decrease in dry weight and subsequent increase in lifting capacity. Advance gas turbine engines and composite rotors significantly increased the type’s performance envelope. Lastly, the final Hinds were equipped with state of the art Soviet avionics and weapons systems.

  • Role: Attack helicopter with transport capabilities
  • National origin: Soviet Union/Russia
  • Manufacturer: Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant
  • First flight: 19 September 1969
  • Introduction: 1972
  • Status: In service
  • Primary users: Soviet Air Force
  • Current users: Zimbabwe Imperial Air Force, Islamic Republic Military
  • Produced: 1969–2021
  • Number built: 2,800 (estimated)

Current operators: Zimbabwe Imperial Air Force, Islamic Republic Military.

Former operators: EBSIS (Czechoslovakian Air Force, East German Air Force, Hungarian Air Force, Fuerza Aérea Sandinista, Soviet Air Force Afghan Air Force, Cuban Air Force, Ethiopian Air Force, Iraqi Air Force, North Korean Air Force, Polish Land Forces), Algerian Air Force, Angolan Air Force, Azerbaijani Air Forces, Brazilian Air Force, Burkina Faso Air Force, Burundi Army Aviation, Chadian Air Force, Congolese Air Force, Cyprus Air Forces, Djibouti Air Force, Equatorial Guinean Air Force, Eritrean Air Force, Military of Guinea, Indian Air Force, Indonesian Army, Libyan Air Force, Air Force of Mali, Mongolian Air Force, Military of Mozambique, Myanmar Air Force, Namibian Air Force, Air Force of Niger, Pakistan Army, Peruvian Air Force, Military of Rwanda, Senegalese Air Force, Sierra Leone Air Wing, Sri Lanka Air Force, Sudanese Air Force, Syrian Air Force, Ugandan Air Force, Army of Venezuela, Vietnam People’s Air Force, Yemen Air Force.

 

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: unknown

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

McDonnell Douglas VF/A-15 Hornet II Veritech Fighter

VFA-15 CMcDonnell Douglas VF/A-15 Hornet II Veritech Fighter

by Tim Wing

The VF/A-15 Hornet II is a multi-role variable fighter, which was designed by McDonnell Douglas for the Terran Union Armed Forces Navy (Terran Navy) in the late fifties. It was meant to replace the VF-14 Omega in Terran Naval service. The Hornet competed for the contract with Shimada Enterprises’ YF-16 Delta (later re-named the Sabre). Along with the Shimada’s YF/B-17 Epsilon (later renamed the Mustang), the Delta was part of the Legioss II system. The Legioss II was to replace the VF-14 Omega and VF/B-9 Beta, which together formed the original Legioss. Though Shimada won the contract for the back section of the Legioss (no other design was submitted), their YF-16 was little more than a redesigned VF-14 Omega, which itself was little more than a redesigned VF/A-6 Alpha. The YF/A-15, on the other hand, was a clean sheet design which introduced many new technologies.

The VF/A-15 Hornet II is a smallish fighter, similar in size to the VF-14 which it replaced. The transformation sequence is similar to the old Alpha and Omega fighters. In atmosphere the Hornet enjoys a thrust to weight ratio well in excess of any fighter to come before it, and with its large forward swept wings it is the most maneuverable Veritech fighter ever produced. The Hornet introduced a full virtual cockpit, with the pilot completely protected by armor. Surrounding the pilot is a 360 degree view of the world outside, projected in full three dimensional detail. While the Hornet has increased its internal reaction mass tankage over the Omega which it replaces, it is still fundamentally an atmospheric fighter. Only when combined with the VF/B-17 Mustang does it come into its own as a space fighter.

  • VFA-15 DRole: Multi-role variable fighter
  • Manufacturer: McDonnell Douglas
  • First flight: December 2057 (YF/A-15 prototype)
  • Introduction: September 2061
  • Status: In service
  • Produced: from 2060
  • Number built: 2500 (1250 additional on order, with more expected)
  • Wing span: 10.4 meters (fighter mode)
  • Weight: 21 metric tons (dry)

 


 

 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. Genesis Climber MOSPEADA (R) is the property of Fuji Television, Artmic Studio and Tatsunoko Production. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Yoshitaka Amano, Shinji Aramaki and Hideki Kakinuma

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

Shimada Enterprises VPA-Series Hargun Light Veritech Motorcycle

VPA-01 A

ROBOTECH Technical Files

by Peter Walker and Pieter Thomassen, with Rob Morgenstern

Designation: Shimada Enterprises VPA-Series Hargun Light Veritech Motorcycle

I. Dimensions:

VPA-01 Hargun

  • Height, Battloid: 3.96 meters
  • Depth, Battloid: 1.80 meters
  • Breadth, Battloid: 2.50 meters
  • Length, cycle: 2.85 meters
  • Width, cycle: 0.88 meters
  • Height, cycle: 1.20 meters
  • Weight: 930 kg

VPA-S-01 Space Hargun

  • Height, Battloid: 3.96 meters
  • Depth, Battloid: 2.75 meters
  • Breadth, Battloid: 2.50   meters
  • Weight: 1100 kg

II. Type:

  • VPA-01 Hargun: one man semi-variable police/combat cycle.
  • VPA-S-01 Space Hargun: one man space-optimized light Battloid.

III. Service History:

  • VPA-01 Hargun: Served with the Global Military Police’s Enforcement Corps from 2027 until 2029.
  • VPA-S-01 Space Hargun: Served with the UEDF Tactical Space Corps from 2029 until the Invid invasion.

IV: Propulsion:

(All)

  • Power-source: 4 standard protoculture cells, two in the main body, two in the lower legs.
  • Assorted small reaction thrusters and gyroscopes for all-environment maneuvers, attitude adjustment, and stability.

(Hargun)

  • Two electric motors for propulsion in cycle mode.
  • Two thruster ports in the back, 1 in each leg, and another auxiliary thruster in each ankle.

(Space Hargun)

  • As per Hargun Battloid, with an additional three-nozzle TurboUnion RP-1A thruster pack mounted on the back, replacing the thrusters on the Hargun’s back. Max thrust 9.5 kN for 70 seconds.

V. Performance:

(Hargun)

  • Cycle mode maximum speed: 340 kph.
  • Battloid mode maximum speed: 50 kph.
  • Maximum flying speed (Battloid): 175 kph.
  • Power-cell endurance: 114 hours continuous operations.

(Space Hargun)

  • Battloid mode maximum speed: 45 kph.
  • Maximum flying speed (Battloid): 175 kph.
  • Power-cell endurance: 100 hours continuous operations.
  • Delta-v capacity: 0.61 kps

VI. Electronics:

Radar Tracking:

  • Thomson Cyclops short range radar (3 km range) and HUD in Battloid mode,

Optical Tracking:

  • Texas Instruments UV, IIR and optical sight system with light intensifier and computer enhancement.
  • Hollandse Signaal computer targeting system with stereoscopic laser targeting.

VII. Armament:

(Typical – any Hargun can carry any of the hand-held weapons, but may not be able to integrate them into the transformation sequence.)

(Hargun)VPA-01 P1

  • 1 x Colt GU-19, 32mm Gun pod with three 20 round magazines. It was designed to use the 32mm ammunition stocks for the old UN Army Spartan Destroid’s TZ-IV gun clusters and the Commanchero side cannons. Capable of semi-automatic and automatic fire, the latter with a cyclic rate of 150 rounds per minute.
  • Or 1 x N-1 Net launcher. This weapon fires a net composed of tungsten-steel filaments which can ensnare a medium mecha-sized target at 15m.

(Space Hargun)

  • 1 x General Electric GU-11S, 55mm short barreled version of the GU-11, with 250 rounds of Armor Piercing Fin Stabilized Discarding Sabot (APFSDS) and High Explosive Squash Head-Incendiary (HESH-I) shells. Cannon fires at 200 rounds/minute.

VIII. Armor:

The armor of the Hargun is composed of a plastic-ceramic composite for maximal resistance to penetration and thermic explosive damage for minimal weight. The armor stops all small arms fire, provides fair to good protection against heavier infantry weapons, such as a 12.7mm machinegun round, and poor to fair resistance to light mecha-mounted weaponry, such as the Zentraedi 22.3mm HE autocannon round.

The armor on the parrying shield issued standard with the Hargun is made of a low-mass Chobham, similar in composition and protection to the main armor on the AGACS. The shield magnetically mounts to the left arm.

The Hargun provided full protection from nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards in Battloid mode, using an overpressure cockpit environment activated by radiation and hazardous chemical sensors, or manually when biological warfare conditions are anticipated. The internal consumables supplies can provide atmosphere for six hours maximum, except for the Space Hargun, whose tanks can hold two days’ worth of life support.

Note that the above armor data assumes that the pilot is himself wearing some sort of body armor; a heavy weapon hit to the cockpit area may result in shrapnel being released into the vehicle, injuring an unarmored occupant. In cycle mode the pilot rides unprotected from the elements and incoming fire on top of the vehicle.

VPA-01 CIX. Development:

As the United Earth Defense Force (UEDF) contemplated the future of its significant investment in infantry units, its generals began to lament the relative impotency of even the best-equipped infantryman against armor and mecha. Using the exact same rationalization as the United Earth Expeditionary Force (UEEF) would in the development of the Cyclone, the UEDF began to develop light ground Veritechs as well.

The result was a series of Veritech motorcycles based around a common torso concept. Unlike the UEEF’s Cyclone, the pilot of these mecha was fully enclosed in armor in Battloid mode, and the unit was a true mecha, not a battlesuit.

VPA-01 F
The result of the preliminary studies was the Hargun Combat Cycle. The torso prototype was finalized in 2020, but at this time the engineers were still having trouble developing the collapsible arms and legs. As a stopgap solution for the prototype, a special utility truck was developed for the Hargun. The Hargun operator would drive into the utility vehicle, where the arms and legs would be attached while the motorcycle transformed into a torso, and the entire mecha would be lifted into a standing position. Despite the cumbersome transformation sequence, the Hargun was a strong, quick, light Battloid. Its 32mm gun pod was a little underpowered, but would still be very effective against full-sized Zentraedi. The Global Military Police were so impressed with it that they ordered several thousand built, to be stationed in urban centers around the globe, with the understanding that they would be refit to fully transformable versions as soon as the new limbs were available. As it happened, the new limbs would require extensive redesigns on the torso itself to mate to it, and the Veritech version of the Hargun soon became a dead end. However, it was still a valuable Battloid, and because of the inability for the Battloid to quickly enter a battle without the unarmed and poorly armored service vehicle, the GMP ordered a heavier version of their combat Hoverplatform that could drop the Battloid Hargun into a firefight, while using its own guns to suppress enemy resistance. The Harguns and their delivery vehicles first entered service in 2025.

VPA-S-01 AIn anticipation of the fully transformable MODAT, all Harguns were eventually fitted with a new head (including 4 low output lasers), a space-thruster backpack, and the GU-11S 55mm carbine. These refits, called the Space Hargun, were transferred to the Tactical Space Corps (with transformation switch disabled) beginning in 2027, and served the TSC in areas of support, lunar patrol, maintenance, and light combat duty until the Invid invasion.

 

 

 


 

Robotech (R) is the property of Harmony Gold. Megazone 23 (R) is the property of A.D. Vision and studios AIC, Artland & Tatsunoko. This document is in no way intended to infringe upon their rights.

Original artwork by: Shinji Aramaki, Toshihiro Hirano, Haruhiko Mikimoto, Yasuomi Umetsu and Hiroyuki Kitazume

Acknowledgement is extended to Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide. Peter Walker, Pieter Thomassen and Robert Morgenstern are given credit for all quotes and paraphrasing of the unofficial Robotech Reference Guide that has been utilized in this publication. 

Content by Peter Walker and Pieter Thomassen, with Rob Morgenstern

Copyright © 1999, 1997, 1995 Robert Morgenstern, Pieter Thomassen, Peter Walker