Миль Ми-8 и Ми-17 вертолет Транспорт варианты

Hip 1Mil Mi-8 and Mi-17 (Hip) Transport Helicopter variants

from Wikipedia

edited by Tim Wing

 

V-8 (Hip-A): The original single-engined prototype.

V-8A: A twin-engined prototype, featuring TV2-117 turboshaft engines, the prototype underwent further modifications during its life.

V-8AT: Prototype of the Mi-8T utility version.

Mi-8 (Hip-B): Twin-engined prototype.

Mi-8TG: Conversion to operate on LPG gas.

Mi-18: Prototype design, a modification of the existing Mil Mi-8. Two Mi-8s were extended by 0.9 meters (3 ft), the landing gear made retractable, and a sliding door added to the starboard side of the fuselage. The Mi-18s were used in the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and later used as static training airframes for pilots of the Mi-8/17.

Mi-8T (Hip-C): First mass production utility transport version, it can carry four UV-16-57 unguided rocket pods, (with S-5 rockets), on four weapons pylons on two sub-wings, and is armed with one or two side mounted PK machine guns.

Mi-8TV: Armed version of the Mi-8T.

Mi-8TVK (Hip-E, aka Mi-8TB): Version used as a gunship or direct air support platform. Airframe modifications add 2x external hard points for a total of 6, and mount a flexible 12.7 mm (0.5-inch) KV-4 machine gun in the nose. Armament of 57 mm S-5 rockets, six UV-32-57 rocket pods, 551-lb (250-kg) bombs, or four AT-2 Swatter ATGMs.

Mi-8TBK (Hip-F): Armed export version, fitted with six launch rails to carry and fire Malyutka missiles.

Mi-8IV (Hip-G, a.k.a. Mi-9): Airborne command post version fitted with “Ivolga” system, characterized by antennas, and Doppler radar on tail boom.

Mi-8PP (Hip-K): Airborne jamming platform with “Polye” (field) system. From 1980, the type was fitted with the new “Akatsiya” system and redesignated the Mi-8PPA. It is characterized by six “X”-shaped antennas on each side of the aft fuselage. Built to escort troop-carrying versions of this helicopter, and disrupt potentially-nearby SPAAG radars, such as those of the Flakpanzer Gepard.

Mi-8PD: Polish airborne command post version.

Mi-8SMV (Hip-J): Airborne jamming platform with “Smalta-V” system, characterized by two small boxes on each side of the fuselage. Used for protection of ground attack aircraft against enemy air defenses.

Mi-8VPK (Hip-D, a.k.a. Mi-8VzPU): Airborne communications platform with rectangular communication canisters mounted on weapons racks and with two frame-type aerials above the rear fuselage.

Mi-8AD: Minelaying version with four VSM-1 dispensers. Each dispenser contains 29 cassettes KSO-1 with anti-personnel mines, for example 7,424 x PFM-1 or 464 x POM-2 or 116 x PTM-3.

Mi-8AV: Minelaying version with VMR-1 or −2 system for 64 or 200 anti-tank mines.

Mi-8BT: Mine-clearing version.

Mi-8MB Bissektrisa: Military ambulance version.

Mi-8R (a.k.a. Mi-8GR): Tactical reconnaissance version with Elint system “Grebeshok-5”.

Mi-8K: Artillery observation, reconnaissance version.

Mi-8TP: Military staff transport version, fitted with improved radio equipment R-832 and R-111.

Mi-8SKA: Photo-reconnaissance version.

Mi-8T(K): Photo-reconnaissance version.

Mi-8TZ: Fuel transport tanker version.

Mi-8MSB: Modernized multipurpose helicopter for the Ukrainian Armed Forces.[12]

Mi-8T (Hip-C): Civilian and military utility transport version, with accommodation for 24 passengers, fitted with tip-up seats along the cabin walls, circular cabin windows and large rear clamshell doors with a sloping hinge line. The Mi-8T is powered by two 1,677 shp (1,251 kW) Klimov TV2-117A turboshaft engines, giving the helicopter a maximum speed of 155 mph (249 km/h) at sea level.

Mi-8P: Civilian passenger transport version, with accommodation for between 28 and 32 passengers, fitted with square cabin windows, small rear clamshell doors with a vertical hinge line and a horizontally split rear airstair door in between; powered by two 1,700 hp (1,300 kW) Klimov TV2-117A turboshaft engines.

Mi-8S Salon: Civilian VIP transport version, with accommodation for between 9 and 11 passengers, equipped with a galley and toilet.

Mi-8MPS: Search and rescue version (operated usually in Malaysia for Fire and Rescue Department services).

Mi-8MA: Polar exploration version for use in the Arctic.

Mi-8MT: Flying crane version.

Mi-8AT: Civilian transport version, fitted with two improved TV2-117AG turboshaft engines.

Mi-8ATS: Agricultural version, fitted with a hopper and spray bars.

Mi-8TL: Air accident investigation version.

Mi-8TM: Upgraded transport version, fitted with a weather radar.

Mi-8TS: Hot and high desert version.

Mi-8VIP: Deluxe VIP transport version, with accommodation for between 7 and 9 passengers.

Mi-8PA: Modified version for Japanese regulations. One only was built, in 1980. It was used by Aero Asahi for heavy material transport in a mountainous region.

Mi-8AMT: Slightly modified version of Kazan’s Mi-8MTV, built in Ulan-Ude from 1991 and still powered by TV3-117VM engines although nowadays VK-2500 engines are optional. Also known as Mi-171.

Mi-8AMTSh: Armed assault version of the Mi-8AMT, can carry the same range of weapons as the Mi-24 including the “Shturm” ATGM. Fitted with a new large door on the right side (except the prototype), aramid fiber plates around the cockpit area and engines, and sometimes a loading ramp in place of the usual clamshell doors. The Soviet air force received a first batch of 10 Mi-8AMTSh in December 2010. Mi-8AMTSh passed to the Defense Ministry obtains a larger capacity engines VK-2500 with an upgraded (reinforced) transmission that provide objective control of exploratory work, and make the use of the helicopter in the highlands and hot climates more efficient.

Mi-8MT (a.k.a. Mi-17): Basic updated version of the Mi-8T, powered by two 1,397 kW (1,874 hp) Klimov TV3-117MT turboshaft engines. Provision for twin or triple external stores racks. The export version is known as Mi-17.

Mi-8MTV: Hot and High version, powered by two Klimov TV3-117VM high-altitude turboshaft engines. This type has a maximum ceiling of 6,000 m.

Mi-8MTV-1: Radar-equipped civil version of the Mi-8MTV. Russian designation of the Mi-17-1V.

Mi-8MTV-2: Improved version of the MTV-1 with enhanced armor, updated systems, an anti-torque rotor and accommodation for 30 instead of 24 troops.

Mi-8MTV-3: Military version of the Mi-8MTV-2, fitted with four instead of six hardpoints, but the number of possible external stores combinations was increased from 8 to 24.

Mi-8MTV-5: Military utility transport helicopter, powered by two Klimov TV3-117VM turboshaft engines and equipped with a loading ramp instead of the clam-shell doors, an additional door and a new “dolphin nose”. First deliveries to the VVS in 2015. Deliveries continued in 2016 and 2017. These helicopters were intended for the transport of goods and machinery weighing up to 4 tons, and these helicopters could be equipped with rocket-cannon armament. The cockpit lighting was suitable for night vision goggles use, which allowed to operate in the dark at low and extremely low altitudes.

Mi-8MTV-5-Ga: Civilian version of the Mi-8MTV-5.

Mi-8MTKO: Night attack conversion of the Mi-8MT and Mi-8MTV helicopters.

Mi-8MTD: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTF: Smoke-screen laying version.

Mi-8MTG: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT with “Gardenya-1FVE” single H/I-band jamming system. Export designation Mi-17PG.

Mi-8MTI (Hip-H EW5): Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT with “Ikebana” single D-band jamming system. Also known as Mi-13, export designation Mi-17PI.

Mi-8MTPB (Hip-H EW3): Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT with “Bizon” jamming system. Export designation Mi-17PP.

Mi-8MTPSh: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT with “Shakhta” jamming system. Export designation Mi-17PSh.

Mi-8MTS: Sigint version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTR1: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT. The Soviet Air Force (VVS) received 18 Mi-8MTPR-1 electronic warfare (EW) helicopters in 2017. Mi-8MTPR-1 is a standard Mi-8MTV-5-1 with a ‘Rychag-AV’ active jamming station installed on board. The helicopters are designed to be able to detect and suppress electronic command-and-control systems as well as the radars of surface-to air and air-to-air missiles.

Mi-8MTR2: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTSh1: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTSh2 (Hip-H EW4): Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTSh3 (Hip-H EW6): Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTT: SIGINT version of the Mi-8MT.

Mi-8MTYa: Electronic warfare version of the Mi-8MT with “Yakhont” system.

Mi-8MS: VIP version. Sub-variants are Mi-8MSO and Mi-8MSD.

Mi-17 (Hip-H): Improved version of the Mi-8, powered by two Klimov TV3-117MT turboshaft engines. Basic production version.

Mi-17-1: Export version of Mi-8AMT.

Mi-17-1M: High altitude operations version, powered by two Klimov TV3-117VM turboshaft engines.

Mi-17-1V: Military transport, helicopter gunship version, powered by two Klimov TV3-117VM turboshaft engines. Export version of the Mi-8MTV-1.

Mi-17-1VA: Flying hospital version.

Mi-17-2: Export version of Mi-8MTV-2.

Mi-17V-3: Export version of the Mi-8MTV-3.

Mi-17V-5: Export version of the Mi-8MTV-5.

Mi-17V-7: Mi-17V-5 equipped with VK-2500 engine and clam shell doors.[47]

Mi-17M: Demonstration model from 1993, served as the basis for the Mi-17MD (nowadays known as Mi-17V-5).

Mi-17MD: Initial designator of the Mi-17V-5, developed in 1995 and from 1996 fitted with a loading ramp.

Mi-17KF: Export version fitted with new avionics including Inertial Navigation Unit along with GPS at tail boom.

Mi-17N: Export version of the Mi-8MTKO with GOES-321M turret with LLLTV and FLIR.

Mi-17P: Export version, passenger transport helicopter.

Mi-17PG: Export version of the Mi-8MTG.

Mi-17PI: Export version of the Mi-8MTI.

Mi-17PP: Export version of the Mi-8MTPB.

Mi-17S: VIP version.

Mi-17AE: Little-known SAR and Medevac version given to Poland.

Mi-17 LPZS: Specialized version for the SAR units.

Mi-17Z-2 Přehrada: Czechoslovakia electronic warfare version with two large canisters on each side.

Mi-18: Prototype design, a modification of the existing Mil Mi-8. Two Mi-8s were extended by 0.9 meters (3 ft), the landing gear made retractable, and a sliding door added to the starboard side of the fuselage. The Mi-18s were used in the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and later used as static training airframes for pilots of the Mi-8/8MT.

Mi-19: Airborne command post version for tank and motorized infantry commanders (based on Mi-8MT/Mi-17 airframe).

Mi-19R: Airborne command post version similar to Mi-19 for commanders of rocket artillery (based on Mi-8MT/Mi-17 airframe).

Mi-171: Export version of the Mi-8AMT, built in Ulan-Ude.

Mi-171A: Mi-171 civilian passenger helicopter modified to meet FAR 29 and JAR 29 requirement.

Mi-171A1: Mi-171 civilian cargo helicopter modified to meet FAR 29 and JAR 29 requirement.

Mi-171C: Chinese built variant of Mi-171 by Sichuan Lantian Helicopter Company Limited, with two radars, one weather radar in the forward section, and another Doppler navigational radar under tail boom. Clam shell doors are replaced by a single ramp door.

Mi-171E: Mi-171 equipped with VK-2500-03 engines to operate in extreme temperature limits, from -58 to 50 Celsius.

Mi-171M: Modernized Mi-171 to reduce crew from 3 to 2.[49]

Mi-171S: Mi-171 with western avionics such as AN/ARC-320 transceiver, GPS and standard NATO flight responder.

Mi-171Sh: Export version of the Ulan-Udes Mi-8AMTSh.

Mi-172: Civil passenger version manufactured in Kazan plant and based on the Mi-8MTV-3.

 


 

 

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Primary source: Wikipedia Mi-8 Hip

Content by Tim Wing

Copyright © 2015 Tim Wing

 

 

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